Status Definitions

Open

No fire permit is needed to light a fire in the open air.

What does this mean?

As long as you have permission from the relevant land owner you can light a fire in the open air without needing to get a Fire Permit. You still are responsible for the fire and any costs of suppression should the fire escape.

Restricted

A permit is required to light a fire in the open air in this area.

What does this mean?

You will need to contact the Rural Fire Authority to arrange for a Fire Permit. This is likely to involve an inspection of the site where you wish to light a fire. If appropriate a Fire Permit will be issued to you setting out the specific conditions in which you can undertake the burn. This may include clearance distances and weather conditions. You still are responsible for the fire and any costs of suppression should the fire escape.

Prohibited

There is a total ban on the lighting of any fires in the open air in this area.

What does this mean?

No open air fires are allowed to be lit during a Total Fire Ban and it is an offence to do so. Fire dangers are usually high and conditions are very dry. Open air fires include camp fires, bon fires, rubbish fires, braziers, hangi, lovo, umu, flying lanterns, and outdoor incinerators. (Enclosed Gas Barbecues are about the only thing that is OK to use but be careful).

Split

There are different fire seasons across areas of within this district. Please contact your local authority.

What does this mean?

Some Fire Authorities split their districts into geographic zones based on differing fire dangers and risks, and operate different fire seasons in each zone. You need to check with your Rural Fire Authority to identify what fire season status is operating within the area you are in.